The Broken Hoop Quest

The postindian warrior is the simulation of survivance in new stories.

– Gerald Vizenor

 

The Broken Hoop Quest

  • Explore historical trauma, whether experienced by you or by relations.
  • Seek out stories.
  • How might this past trauma impact you today?
  • Tell a story in any medium that reflects your exploration of historical trauma. For example, writing a poem about your experience.
  • Share your act of survivance by emailing the file or posting online, and tagging the act with #survivance.

Words of Woodrow Morrison Jr.

“In my dad’s generation, my father’s now 96 years old, and the generation just before him were sent to Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania. They sent them all the way from Alaska to Pennsylvania and others were sent to the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. When they were there, they had to wear a little patch, like Hitler did to the Jews. But they wore a little patch just with a thin thread holding it on that said ‘Speak English.’ And if I caught you talking Haida, I’d take that name tag, and take that tag and it had your name sewn on the back. At the end of the day we’d turn them in and whoever turned in the most would get a prize. So that was one of the things they did to stop you from speaking your language.”

The Core Values Quest

The postindian warrior is the simulation of survivance in new stories.

– Gerald Vizenor

 

The Core Values Quest

  • What are your core values?
  • Make a list of ten values, which could include Peace, Wealth, Personal Expression, Family, Power, Friendship, Intellect, Career, Fame, Social Justice, Community, Nation, Freedom, Influence, Justice, Happiness, Knowledge, Social Status, Truth, Integrity, Love, Spirituality, Wellness, or Environment.
  • Whittle those down to only five.
  • Then three! You can do it.
  • Then just one. This is the center of your belief system.
  • Tell a story in any medium that reflects the core of your belief system. For example, if Environment is at your center, you can take a photo of a tree.
  • Share your act of survivance by emailing the file or posting online, and tagging the act with #survivance.

Words of Elaine Grinnell

“I can remember Billy Hull coming in the evening on the ebb tide. He would have his canoe and the sail up. He would be sitting back and be low in the water because he had so many fish. And we’d all grab our pans. Grandma would grab her pan and we would all go down in front of his house and he would share those fish with everyone. And I think that’s part of being a tribe. That’s part of being interconnected. What a marvelous thing – and we’d all watch for him!”

The Listening Quest

The postindian warrior is the simulation of survivance in new stories.

– Gerald Vizenor

 

The Orphan: The Listening Quest

  • How do you identify with the boy in the story?
  • How does this influence you now?
  • Tell a story in any medium that reflects your interpretation of the story.
  • For example, if you want to paint, clear a space, pick a surface like a canvas, choose colors, choose brushes, set up water and a plate to put the paint on, turn on music, and begin. This is an act of survivance!
  • Share your act of survivance by emailing the file or posting online, and tagging the act with #survivance.

Words of Roger Fernandes

“At some point, all children, I believe, feel some kind of abuse going on…”

“A long time ago in a village far to the east there lived a little boy. One time his parents died, making him an orphan. No one would take care of this poor boy. He would wander from home to home begging for food and shelter. No one would take him in. They called him ‘Orphan Boy’.”